Just checking something out.

What does the word “No” mean?

Also, what does the word “shall” mean? Give me YOUR definitions, I don’t want dictionary defintions copied and pasted here.

It’s a negative sentiment. Whether with an action, argument or question.
Shall, to me, is a promise to do something.

  1. not yes
  2. should
  1. Negation
  2. Will

A harder one would be “the.”

no would be disapproval.
shall would be will, as in “I shall do that”

1: Maybe Later
2: Do It Tomorrow

No: Don’t wanna but will anyway.
Shall: Will do. Sometime later. Very later.

No is an illusion made by the powers that be to give you the illusion of being in power of your own destiny. Therefore, no is a systemic anomaly in which the calculations of space/time & the expansion of the universe equal 0. Therefore, no is the ultimate negative form on negativity. No is Creation & Destruction, the Beggining & the End, The First & the Last.

Shall=Will=Shall=Will=Shall=Will

Shall+No=^%^%&%^%$#^%$&^&%$$#%^^$#

Hmmm…interesting. Keep it up guys. After I get a couple more posts, I’ll tell you what this is about.

No: opposite of yes
Shall: 1rst person singular form of “will”

No: I won’t/don’t
Shall: I will

The problem is that the words mean nothing, except insofar as they affect other concepts.

No: negates a given thing
Shall: locates an action in the future

No: Oppisite of the next thing you say.
Shall: 1. “Red neck” for “shell”. 2. Oppisite of no.

“Shall” is a bit different from “will,” though. One distinction holds that “will” connotes the desire or intention to do something, whereas “shall” connotes an obligation, or an event that is inevitable. So, the Bill of Rights says, “Congress shall make no law…” to indicate that Congress is commanded not to make such laws, whereas if it said, “Congress will make no law…” that would imply that Congress would voluntarily refrain from making such laws.

All right, I guess I’ve got enough responses. It is sort of funny to see some what my teachers have talked about that seemed so stupid. Like one of my teachers was a lawyer before and one of the cases that he worked on went on for about 10 years over the word “shall.” Most of the definitions have had some element of the argument. No on the other hand is something another teacher asked us and we couldn’t really answer it. Both teachers did this to show how interpretation of any sort documents, in those cases the Constitution can be diffcult since each person has a different understanding. SK seems to have had an idea about why i was asking this. It is also just for my own thing to get people’s different perspectives on words since that can deal a lot with how people react to thing we say on the boards.

Now if more people could apply these basic facts to everyday life, the world would be a better place…

That’s a stupid opinion and you’re stupid for having it

just kidding

  1. The opposite of yes.
  2. Command.